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Austin

5th Edition
US $15
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‘Hunting’ in this Texan city is effortless: there are always fantastic bands lighting up the night, or a brand new restaurant luring you in by the nostrils. So don your finest cowboy hat and drop into an art gallery/yoga studio for a stretch and some culture, enjoy the finest New American cuisine, strum on a vintage guitar at a classic musicians’ mecca, and soak up the sun with a dip in the most glorious springs and creeks.
Quotes
If you absolutely must find the best cowboy boots in Austin, Texas, a bait-and-tackle shop with high-design sensibilities in Providence, Rhode Island, a Persian ice cream parlor in Hollywood or Japanese tapas in Brooklyn, these compact urban guides may be for you.
Time Magazine

About the book

Austin has long beckoned creative souls, musicians and offbeat misfits. But in the past few years, its appeal has extended to techies, indie filmmakers and foodies. It’s a mix that elsewhere might struggle to find common ground – not so in Austin.

A mixture of Southern hospitality and earthy crunchiness imbues the air here, making the locals friendly and the city eco-conscious. Despite tremendous growth over the last half-decade, Austin is still a land of craggy creeks, shimmering lakes and natural springs – it’s not uncommon, for example, to see stand-up paddlers moseying down Lake Austin at all hours of the day, or South Austinites taking their lunch break at Barton Springs.

“Hunting” in this city of delightful weirdos is effortless: there are always fantastic bands lighting up the night, or a brand new restaurant luring you in by the nostrils. So consider this guide a collection of the most potent sources of wonder, by a local who is still discovering Austin’s sunny, lovely corners.


About the author

Tolly Moseley has a knack for turning her hobbies into jobs. Based in the gorgeous city of Austin, Texas, she is a writer, aerial silks dancer and yoga teacher. All of which means that she spends half her time performing an array of bodily contortions and the other half hunched over a computer. Her work has appeared in Salon, Texas Parks & Wildlife Magazine and the Austin American-Statesman, and on National Public Radio Austin, as well as her parent’s refrigerator. She tells stories about her life on her blog, austineavesdropper.com.